This portrait of a gentleman wearing 'Windsor Uniform’ - a blue coat, with red collar, was painted by Richard Cosway during the late 1790s. Undertaken during his tenure as court artist to the Prince of Wales, this portrait shows a gentleman wearing the undress version of the Windsor Uniform, introduced by George III in 1777 (the undress in 1798). The uniform is still worn today, although usually only at Windsor Castle and as evening dress. The wearing of such a uniform distinguishes the sitter in this miniature as a senior courtier, as it was was otherwise only worn by members of the British Royal family.

The present miniature has all the hallmarks of the Cosway’s mature style. Using grey hatching to softly shade the face, and subtle strokes of blue paint to lightly cover the bare ivory in the background, he captures the haughty expression of the sitter with seemingly little effort. By this date, Cosway was one...

Read more

This portrait of a gentleman wearing 'Windsor Uniform’ - a blue coat, with red collar, was painted by Richard Cosway during the late 1790s. Undertaken during his tenure as court artist to the Prince of Wales, this portrait shows a gentleman wearing the undress version of the Windsor Uniform, introduced by George III in 1777 (the undress in 1798). The uniform is still worn today, although usually only at Windsor Castle and as evening dress. The wearing of such a uniform distinguishes the sitter in this miniature as a senior courtier, as it was was otherwise only worn by members of the British Royal family. 

The present miniature has all the hallmarks of the Cosway’s mature style. Using grey hatching to softly shade the face, and subtle strokes of blue paint to lightly cover the bare ivory in the background, he captures the haughty expression of the sitter with seemingly little effort. By this date, Cosway was one of the most fashionable portraitists in the country, his studio a merry-go-round of the famous and fashionable; his (and his wife Maria’s) evening salons the most sought-after invitation in the city.

Cosway was born in Devon, but by the age of twelve the precocious young artist had moved to London to study under the tutelage of Thomas Hudson and at Shipley’s drawing school. This was a fortunate apprenticeship, as Shipley, a devoted philanthropist, was extremely influential in the arts. Cosway first exhibited at the Society of Artists in 1760 and entered the Royal Academy Schools in 1769, exhibiting there 1770-1806. In 1786 Cosway was made ‘Miniature Painter to the Prince of Wales’ and they became close friends until the Prince became Regent in 1811 and Cosway lost his position. The last part of Cosway’s life was plagued with illness and tragedy, following the earl death of his only child, a daughter Louisa, in 1796. After being left partially paralysed following a stroke, he died in 1821, leaving behind him a great legacy of work.

Related artworks

Previous
Next
£ 7,500.00
Johann Anton de Peters
£ 7,500

Receive information about exhibitions, news & events.

We will process the personal data you have supplied in accordance with our privacy policy. You can unsubscribe or change your preferences at any time by clicking the link in any emails.

Receive information about exhibitions, news & events.

We will process the personal data you have supplied in accordance with our privacy policy. You can unsubscribe or change your preferences at any time by clicking the link in any emails.
Close

Basket

No items found
Close

Your saved list

This list allows you to enquire about a group of works.
No items found
Close
Mailing list signup

Get exclusive updates from Philip Mould Gallery

Close

Sign up for updates

Artwork enquiry

Receive newsletters

In order to respond to your enquiry, we will process the personal data you have supplied in accordance with our privacy policy. You can unsubscribe or change your preferences at any time by clicking the link in any emails.

Close
Search
Close
Close
500 Years of British Art