This wistful portrait of a young man in a fur-lined hat was painted by Mary Beale, the leading female portrait painter of the Stuart period.

Alongside paid commissions, Beale also painted portraits and head studies for her own study and improvement. These works tend to be less formal and generally depict members of her family and household. The best known of these are arguably the series of unfinished head studies Beale made of her son Bartholomew in the 1660s, examples of which can be found in the Tate Gallery, The Huntington and Yale Center for British Art.

The present work, though more highly finished, nevertheless has a similar air of informality, and is painted with a degree of sensitivity indicative of a close relationship between artist and sitter. Although we cannot be certain of our sitter’s identity, he is probably Charles Beale the younger (1660-1714), the artist’s third son, who was establishing himself as a painter in oils...

Read more

This wistful portrait of a young man in a fur-lined hat was painted by Mary Beale, the leading female portrait painter of the Stuart period.

Alongside paid commissions, Beale also painted portraits and head studies for her own study and improvement. These works tend to be less formal and generally depict members of her family and household. The best known of these are arguably the series of unfinished head studies Beale made of her son Bartholomew in the 1660s, examples of which can be found in the Tate Gallery, The Huntington and Yale Center for British Art.

The present work, though more highly finished, nevertheless has a similar air of informality, and is painted with a degree of sensitivity indicative of a close relationship between artist and sitter. Although we cannot be certain of our sitter’s identity, he is probably Charles Beale the younger (1660-1714), the artist’s third son, who was establishing himself as a painter in oils and miniature when this work was painted in the early 1680s. Due to the fact that Charles, unlike Batholomew, was educated away from home, fewer portraits of him were painted by Beale and at present there are no confirmed likenesses of him. The subject of our work does, however, bear a striking resemblance to the young man portrayed in several drawings by Charles in the British Museum which were once considered to be self-portraits. Like our subject, the young man in the British Museum drawings has a prominent wart on his right jaw and shows an undeniable family resemblance to Mary’s husband Charles. He is also shown wearing the same fur-lined hat that appears in other portraits by Beale of family members, including a study of Charles Beale the elder in the collection at McMaster University’s Museum of Art.

As well as managing Mary’s studio, Charles the elder also kept detailed notebooks which recorded day-to-day activities and listed paintings Mary had completed or was working on. In his notebook from 1681, he lists a picture of ‘Son Charles looking up’, which corresponds with the present work in terms of both date and subject matter.

Receive information about exhibitions, news & events.

We will process the personal data you have supplied in accordance with our privacy policy. You can unsubscribe or change your preferences at any time by clicking the link in any emails.
Close

Basket

No items found
Close

Your saved list

This list allows you to enquire about a group of works.
No items found
Close
Mailing list signup

Get exclusive updates from Philip Mould Gallery

Close

Sign up for updates

Artwork enquiry

Receive newsletters

In order to respond to your enquiry, we will process the personal data you have supplied in accordance with our privacy policy. You can unsubscribe or change your preferences at any time by clicking the link in any emails.

Close
Search
Close
Close
500 Years of British Art