This charming oil on canvas exemplifies Bussy’s recognisably bold use of colour. From c. 1912 Bussy focused on pastel drawings of animals and his attentive approach to painting lead him to the London Zoo, where he studied the animals in depth. Of his work, he noted;

Each [work] is an invention, a poetic composition, not only decorative … the animals I paint and foliage which surrounds them … in my opinion there is no element that has not been the object of patient observation; my numerous studied in pastel, created with the paintings in mind, proves it. My animals, birds and reptiles have nothing trivial; they are actual portraits in which I desire that the resemblance emerges from the incidental with always further clarity, precision and purity.[1] 

Albert Simon Bussy trained at the École des Beuax-Arts in Paris under the Symbolist painter Gustave Moreau (1826-1898). It was at the pioneering Galerie Durand-Ruel that Bussy had his first exhibition...



Read more

This charming oil on canvas exemplifies Bussy’s recognisably bold use of colour. From c. 1912 Bussy focused on pastel drawings of animals and his attentive approach to painting lead him to the London Zoo, where he studied the animals in depth. Of his work, he noted; 

Each [work] is an invention, a poetic composition, not only decorative … the animals I paint and foliage which surrounds them … in my opinion there is no element that has not been the object of patient observation; my numerous studied in pastel, created with the paintings in mind, proves it. My animals, birds and reptiles have nothing trivial; they are actual portraits in which I desire that the resemblance emerges from the incidental with always further clarity, precision and purity.[1] 

Albert Simon Bussy trained at the École des Beuax-Arts in Paris under the Symbolist painter Gustave Moreau (1826-1898). It was at the pioneering Galerie Durand-Ruel that Bussy had his first exhibition of works in pastel between 1897 and 1899. However, it was his association with the Bloomsbury Group of artists and writers that was to become an enduring influence upon his oeuvre. 

On his arrival in London in 1901, Busy was immediately introduced to the artistic and increasingly Bohemian circles that graced the doors of the London Art Club in Mayfair. Here he met the great English painter William Rothenstein (1872-1945) who greatly admired Bussy’s exhibition then on display at Leighton House. 

In particular, it was Dorothy Strachey (1865-1960), novelist and translator, who made the biggest impression on Busy. Strachey was a close friend of the Bloomsbury group and published her novel Olivia through the Hogarth Press with the help of Virginia Woolf, who founded the publishing house with her husband Lenoard. Simon and Dorothy married two years after first meeting, in 1903. This connection firmly places Busy and Strachey at the forefront of one of the most enriching and enduring cultural circles of the twentieth century. 

Bussy and Strachey later set up a home at Le Souco, the house in Roquebrune near Monaco. Le Souco would soon become famous as an intellectual hub where the artistic and literary elite from both sides of the channel were to convene and exchange their ideas. Lytton Strachey, Duncan Grant, Roger Fry, Vanessa Bell and Virgina Woolf all came to stay at Le Souco for long periods of time. Its place within the history of Bloomsbury is as significant, if not as famous, as 46 Gordon Square, London, the home that Vanessa Bell established with her siblings Virgina, Adrian and Thoby in 1904.


[1] S. Bussy quoted in F. Fosca, Simon Bussy, (Paris, 1930) p.8.

Receive information about exhibitions, news & events.

We will process the personal data you have supplied in accordance with our privacy policy. You can unsubscribe or change your preferences at any time by clicking the link in any emails.
Close

Basket

No items found
Close

Your saved list

This list allows you to enquire about a group of works.
No items found
Close
Mailing list signup

Get exclusive updates from Philip Mould Gallery

Close

Sign up for updates

Artwork enquiry

Receive newsletters

In order to respond to your enquiry, we will process the personal data you have supplied in accordance with our privacy policy. You can unsubscribe or change your preferences at any time by clicking the link in any emails.

Close
Search
Close
Close
500 Years of British Art