The artist ‘Freese’ was until recently only identified with his first initial ‘N’, but research by authors and collectors has revealed much more information about his life, along with his first name.[1] The sitter, Anne Bulteel, was born in 1772, and this portrait may have been painted for the occasion of her marriage in the 1790s, making it a relatively early work for Freese. Anne Bulteel, then Harris (a daughter and co-heiress of Christopher Harris of Bellevue, 3rd son of John Harris of Radford in the parish of Plymstock), married Thomas Hillersden Bulteel (1766-1814) and the couple had ten children. They lived at Bellevue House in the parish of Plymstock, Devon.

Nicholas Freese was christened on 23 June 1762 at St Martin, Birmingham, as the son of Nicholas Freese and Elizabeth Rowney, who were married at the same church on 30 March 1758. Nicholas apparently moved to London to study and then married Mary Stokes on 29 August...

Read more

The artist ‘Freese’ was until recently only identified with his first initial ‘N’, but research by authors and collectors has revealed much more information about his life, along with his first name.[1] The sitter, Anne Bulteel, was born in 1772, and this portrait may have been painted for the occasion of her marriage in the 1790s, making it a relatively early work for Freese. Anne Bulteel, then Harris (a daughter and co-heiress of Christopher Harris of Bellevue, 3rd son of John Harris of Radford in the parish of Plymstock), married Thomas Hillersden Bulteel (1766-1814) and the couple had ten children. They lived at Bellevue House in the parish of Plymstock, Devon.

Nicholas Freese was christened on 23 June 1762 at St Martin, Birmingham, as the son of Nicholas Freese and Elizabeth Rowney, who were married at the same church on 30 March 1758. Nicholas apparently moved to London to study and then married Mary Stokes on 29 August 1791 at St Martin in the Fields, Westminster, London. They evidently had a son, George Fraser Freese, in 1792. Wakefield's Merchant and Tradesman's General Directory for London lists him in 1790 as a Portrait and Landscape painter, living at 426 Strand, London. His other known addresses are 411 Strand and 9 Percy Street, London. His work, as seen here, owes much to his contemporaries George Engleheart and Andrew Plimer in terms of palette and technique but he had a distinctive technique which makes his miniatures extremely distinctive.

[1] See http://british-miniatures2.blogspot.com/ accessed 18 February 2010

Receive information about exhibitions, news & events.

We will process the personal data you have supplied in accordance with our privacy policy. You can unsubscribe or change your preferences at any time by clicking the link in any emails.
Close

Basket

No items found
Close

Your saved list

This list allows you to enquire about a group of works.
No items found
Close
Mailing list signup

Get exclusive updates from Philip Mould Gallery

Close

Sign up for updates

Artwork enquiry

Receive newsletters

In order to respond to your enquiry, we will process the personal data you have supplied in accordance with our privacy policy. You can unsubscribe or change your preferences at any time by clicking the link in any emails.

Close
Search
Close
Close
500 Years of British Art