Born in Scotland in 1741, Patrick John McMoreland moved to work in London in 1777, before returning to the north where he worked in Liverpool and subsequently Manchester. Throughout his lifetime, McMoreland taught, lectured and painted to a high standard, exhibiting at the Royal Academy 1776-82 amongst other reputable institutions.

McMoreland practised in enamel, watercolour, on ivory and painted miniatures for rings alongside his landscape and portrait drawings. Such a variety of mediums required a versatile range of skills, which was manifest through his often-fluctuating stylistic approach. He signed many of his works with plain Roman capitals ‘P.M.’ or ‘P.M.c’, with some examples existing in cursive writing.[1]

Fashionable and striking, this delightful miniature depicts a young body in a peppermint green coat with matching buttons and waistcoat. Around his neck sits a white frilled collar and black ribbon, rendered in soft and light detail, each fine stroke highlighting the contours of the sitter’s face and costume. His...

Read more

Born in Scotland in 1741, Patrick John McMoreland moved to work in London in 1777, before returning to the north where he worked in Liverpool and subsequently Manchester. Throughout his lifetime, McMoreland taught, lectured and painted to a high standard, exhibiting at the Royal Academy 1776-82 amongst other reputable institutions.

McMoreland practised in enamel, watercolour, on ivory and painted miniatures for rings alongside his landscape and portrait drawings. Such a variety of mediums required a versatile range of skills, which was manifest through his often-fluctuating stylistic approach. He signed many of his works with plain Roman capitals ‘P.M.’ or ‘P.M.c’, with some examples existing in cursive writing.[1]

Fashionable and striking, this delightful miniature depicts a young body in a peppermint green coat with matching buttons and waistcoat. Around his neck sits a white frilled collar and black ribbon, rendered in soft and light detail, each fine stroke highlighting the contours of the sitter’s face and costume. His youthful appearance is reflected in McMoreland’s implementation of soft colours and delicate brushwork, which fosters an overall atmosphere of childlike innocence.

McMoreland’s paintings now form part of the collections at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, the British Museum, London, the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford and Dunham Massey Hall, Greater Manchester.

[1] D. Foskett., British Portrait Miniatures (London: Methuen & Company Limited, 1963) p.149.

Receive information about exhibitions, news & events.

We will process the personal data you have supplied in accordance with our privacy policy. You can unsubscribe or change your preferences at any time by clicking the link in any emails.
Close

Basket

No items found
Close

Your saved list

This list allows you to enquire about a group of works.
No items found
Close
Mailing list signup

Get exclusive updates from Philip Mould Gallery

Close

Sign up for updates

Artwork enquiry

Receive newsletters

In order to respond to your enquiry, we will process the personal data you have supplied in accordance with our privacy policy. You can unsubscribe or change your preferences at any time by clicking the link in any emails.

Close
Search
Close
Close
500 Years of British Art