Previously attributed to Thomas Flatman, this miniature of an unknown gentleman fits perfectly with the small group of work signed with the monogram ‘DM’, assumed to be the artists David Myers. Little is known about this British miniaturist, butt is understood that he was working in England between c.1659 and 1676. Indeed, there are at least sixteen miniatures attributed to him, all of which fit within this time frame. Daphne Foskett describes his work as ‘unpretentious’ and speaks of its ‘naïve charm’.[1] Despite a small body of work, his miniatures consistently succeed in an individualism occasionally missing from the body of work painted by more prolific artists. He may well belong to a group of gentleman amateurs, who counted among them Marshall, Flatman and Snelling.

Myers painted several members of the English nobility and high society, such as William Hevingham, Sir William Bastard, Henry Turne, Mary, Lady Leigh, and Thomas, Lord Leigh of Stoneleigh.[2] Some of his miniatures are...

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Previously attributed to Thomas Flatman, this miniature of an unknown gentleman fits perfectly with the small group of work signed with the monogram ‘DM’, assumed to be the artists David Myers. Little is known about this British miniaturist, butt is understood that he was working in England between c.1659 and 1676. Indeed, there are at least sixteen miniatures attributed to him, all of which fit within this time frame. Daphne Foskett describes his work as ‘unpretentious’ and speaks of its ‘naïve charm’.[1] Despite a small body of work, his miniatures consistently succeed in an individualism occasionally missing from the body of work painted by more prolific artists. He may well belong to a group of gentleman amateurs, who counted among them Marshall, Flatman and Snelling.

Myers painted several members of the English nobility and high society, such as William Hevingham, Sir William Bastard, Henry Turne, Mary, Lady Leigh, and Thomas, Lord Leigh of Stoneleigh.[2] Some of his miniatures are housed in public collections, such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and the Victoria and Albert Museum in London.

[1] Daphne Foskett, Miniatures: Dictionary and Guide, (Suffolk: Antique Collectors’ Club Ltd., 1990) p.593

[2] Foskett, p.593-594.

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500 Years of British Art