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Zoomable Image of A View of Two Bridges, 1923

A View of Two Bridges, 1923

Sir Cedric Lockwood Morris, Bt. (1889-1982)

A View of Two Bridges, 1923

Sir Cedric Lockwood Morris, Bt. (1889-1982)

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Price:

Price on request

Materials:

Oil on canvas

Dimensions:

21 4/16 x 28 12/16 in (54 x 73 cm)

Provenance:

Private collection, Manchester, by 1930 Private collection, UK

Inscriptions:

Signed and dated ‘C. Morris 23’ (lower right), title verso

While in Céret, Morris continued to paint prolifically, most likely working en plein air directly in front of his subjects. This was one of the central contributing principles of impressionist painting, which Morris exploits in Pyrénées-Orientales to great effect, working outdoors and painting quickly to emphasise the painterly texture...

Between early 1921 and 1925, Morris and Lett were based primarily in Paris. Although never staying for longer than two months at a time, they rented several studios during their extended sojourn and used them as bases from which to work and depart from on their extensive European travels. In 1923, they left the capital for the quiet bohemian town of Céret in southwest France, bordering the foothills of the Pyrénées mountain range. At the time, Céret was a town rich in connections with European Modernism, having hosted artists such as Georges Braque (1882–1963), Marc Chagall (1887–1985) and Pablo Picasso (1881–1973) only a decade earlier.

While in Céret, Morris continued to paint prolifically, most likely working en plein air directly in front of his subjects. This was one of the central contributing principles of impressionist painting, which Morris exploits in A View of Two Bridges to great effect, working outdoors and painting quickly to emphasise the painterly texture.

Morris painted three views of the twin bridges. One of which, Les Ponts de Céret (1923), is in the Tate Collection (T07784). The Pont du Diable, or Devil’s Bridge, can be seen in the background of this work and dates from the early-14th century. Through this, as well as his choice of a central vantage point, Morris is able to reinforce the overall feeling of compositional harmony expressed in the scene.

About the artist

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