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This view of a barn at Charleston Farmhouse, home to Bloomsbury artist Duncan Grant, was painted during the same year as his retrospective exhibition at The Tate. During the First World War, Grant moved to Charleston Farmhouse in East Sussex with fellow artist Vanessa Bell and his lover David Garnett. During both World Wars, Charleston became a permanent family home for Grant and Bell, and throughout the inter-war and post-war years, it was transformed into popular haunt for the fashionable Bloomsbury circle. The legacy of Charleston Farmhouse lies equally in the programme of interior and decorative works, and in their paintings of the house and its agricultural surrounds. Agricultural activity abounded around them at Charleston, and Duncan and Vanessa sketched, drew and painted its manifestations. Numerous sketchbooks held at Charleston are filled with studies of the farm, from barns and sheep to cattle and chickens. This continual stream of inspiration upon their doorstep, evolving and shifting with each season, was...

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This view of a barn at Charleston Farmhouse, home to Bloomsbury artist Duncan Grant, was painted during the same year as his retrospective exhibition at The Tate. During the First World War, Grant moved to Charleston Farmhouse in East Sussex with fellow artist Vanessa Bell and his lover David Garnett. During both World Wars, Charleston became a permanent family home for Grant and Bell, and throughout the inter-war and post-war years, it was transformed into popular haunt for the fashionable Bloomsbury circle. The legacy of Charleston Farmhouse lies equally in the programme of interior and decorative works, and in their paintings of the house and its agricultural surrounds. Agricultural activity abounded around them at Charleston, and Duncan and Vanessa sketched, drew and painted its manifestations. Numerous sketchbooks held at Charleston are filled with studies of the farm, from barns and sheep to cattle and chickens. This continual stream of inspiration upon their doorstep, evolving and shifting with each season, was one they turned into an artistic gift. In the later years, many of the agricultural buildings at Charleston sank into disrepair, causing great upset to Grant, whose enduring attachment to the farm and its agricultural legacy lasted his whole life.

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500 Years of British Art