This study for a composition was most likely undertaken sometime after 1910 when McEvoy’s style of painting was beginning to loosen and probably before 1915, when, following the successful exhibition of Madame¸ he turned his attention to portrait painting.

In this remarkable work McEvoy’s exemplary pencil-work and draftsmanship is evident in all its usual meticulousness. Unlike many of his contemporaries, rather than viewing this mark-making process as a set of restrictive instructions to follow, he instead used them as a foundation from which to build line, form and colour as his principal means of expression.

Whilst distinct pencil outlines chart McEvoy’s initial composition of the painting, layers of pink wash add subtle depth. Linear black strokes of paint, placed rapidly on top outline abstracted figures, adding noticeable energy to the work. This daring application of paint demonstrates a valuable glimpse into McEvoy’s working methods.

This study for a composition was most likely undertaken sometime after 1910 when McEvoy’s style of painting was beginning to loosen and probably before 1915, when, following the successful exhibition of Madame¸ he turned his attention to portrait painting.



Read more

In this remarkable work McEvoy’s exemplary pencil-work and draftsmanship is evident in all its usual meticulousness. Unlike many of his contemporaries, rather than viewing this mark-making process as a set of restrictive instructions to follow, he instead used them as a foundation from which to build line, form and colour as his principal means of expression. 

Whilst distinct pencil outlines chart McEvoy’s initial composition of the painting, layers of pink wash add subtle depth. Linear black strokes of paint, placed rapidly on top outline abstracted figures, adding noticeable energy to the work. This daring application of paint demonstrates a valuable glimpse into McEvoy’s working methods.

This study for a composition was most likely undertaken sometime after 1910 when McEvoy’s style of painting was beginning to loosen and probably before 1915, when, following the successful exhibition of Madame¸ he turned his attention to portrait painting.

Receive information about exhibitions, news & events.

We will process the personal data you have supplied in accordance with our privacy policy. You can unsubscribe or change your preferences at any time by clicking the link in any emails.

Receive information about exhibitions, news & events.

We will process the personal data you have supplied in accordance with our privacy policy. You can unsubscribe or change your preferences at any time by clicking the link in any emails.
Close

Basket

No items found
Close

Your saved list

This list allows you to enquire about a group of works.
No items found
Close
Mailing list signup

Get exclusive updates from Philip Mould Gallery

Close

Sign up for updates

Make an Enquiry

Receive newsletters

In order to respond to your enquiry, we will process the personal data you have supplied in accordance with our privacy policy. You can unsubscribe or change your preferences at any time by clicking the link in any emails.

Close
Search
Close
500 Years of British Art