Wales was a place of immense significance to Morris. Despite living in Suffolk for the majority of his life, he always felt a great affinity to the land of his birth and heritage. In 1935, Morris travelled extensively through Wales to organise and promote ‘The Contemporary Welsh Art Exhibition’. The exhibition, which Morris coordinated in league with Augustus John (1878–1961), toured the country from July to August, ending in Cardiff. The exhibition eventually culminated in the founding of the Contemporary Arts Society for Wales. Stylistically speaking, the present work closely resembles Morris’s Irish landscapes, painted in County Galway in 1936. Due to the lengthy period he spent in Wales during 1935, it would appear likely that Morris painted this work when travelling through Pembrokeshire over the summer. Taking inspiration from the local communities bound to arable land in the Welsh countryside, Morris directs the focus of this work onto a humble domestic dwelling on the fertile hillside. The house is...

Read more

Wales was a place of immense significance to Morris. Despite living in Suffolk for the majority of his life, he always felt a great affinity to the land of his birth and heritage. In 1935, Morris travelled extensively through Wales to organise and promote ‘The Contemporary Welsh Art Exhibition’. The exhibition, which Morris coordinated in league with Augustus John (1878–1961), toured the country from July to August, ending in Cardiff. The exhibition eventually culminated in the founding of the Contemporary Arts Society for Wales.

Stylistically speaking, the present work closely resembles Morris’s Irish landscapes, painted in County Galway in 1936. Due to the lengthy period he spent in Wales during 1935, it would appear likely that Morris painted this work when travelling through Pembrokeshire over the summer. Taking inspiration from the local communities bound to arable land in the Welsh countryside, Morris directs the focus of this work onto a humble domestic dwelling on the fertile hillside. The house is an embodiment of Morris’s respect and appreciation for the traditional way of life maintained by his fellow countrymen. The simplified aesthetic remains a dominant aspect of Morris’s pictorial language when articulating a sense of place throughout his career.

Receive information about exhibitions, news & events.

We will process the personal data you have supplied in accordance with our privacy policy. You can unsubscribe or change your preferences at any time by clicking the link in any emails.
Close

Basket

No items found
Close

Your saved list

This list allows you to enquire about a group of works.
No items found
Close
Mailing list signup

Get exclusive updates from Philip Mould Gallery

Close

Sign up for updates

Artwork enquiry

Receive newsletters

In order to respond to your enquiry, we will process the personal data you have supplied in accordance with our privacy policy. You can unsubscribe or change your preferences at any time by clicking the link in any emails.

Close
Search
Close
Close
500 Years of British Art