The sitter in this portrait by the court artist Richard ‘Dwarf’ Gibson is believed to be Elizabeth Capell, who was born at Petworth Manor, Sussex in 1636. She was one of five daughters of Algernon Percy, 10th Earl of Northumberland and Lady Anne Cecil. If this portrait does indeed represent Elizabeth it may have been painted around the time of her marriage to Arthur Capell, 2nd Baron Capell of Hadhamin in 1653. In 1661, her husband was made first Earl of Essex and in 1672 was appointed Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. Ten years later, on his return to England, Arthur was implicated in the ‘Rye House Plot’, taking his own life when incarcerated in the Tower of London and leaving Elizabeth a widow at the age of 43.

The miniaturist of the present work, Richard Gibson, was born in Cumberland and worked as an apprentice in a tapestry works at Mortlake before entering the household of Philip Herbert...

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The sitter in this portrait by the court artist Richard ‘Dwarf’ Gibson is believed to be Elizabeth Capell, who was born at Petworth Manor, Sussex in 1636. She was one of five daughters of Algernon Percy, 10th Earl of Northumberland and Lady Anne Cecil. If this portrait does indeed represent Elizabeth it may have been painted around the time of her marriage to Arthur Capell, 2nd Baron Capell of Hadhamin in 1653. In 1661, her husband was made first Earl of Essex and in 1672 was appointed Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. Ten years later, on his return to England, Arthur was implicated in the ‘Rye House Plot’, taking his own life when incarcerated in the Tower of London and leaving Elizabeth a widow at the age of 43.

The miniaturist of the present work, Richard Gibson, was born in Cumberland and worked as an apprentice in a tapestry works at Mortlake before entering the household of Philip Herbert 4th Earl of Pembroke. By 1639 he was employed in the court as a ‘Page of the Back-Stairs’, experiencing great popularity with the King. Through the catalogue of Abraham van der Doort, keeper of the Royal Collection, we know that by this point Gibson was actively painting, for the former recounts the artist copying ‘the Picture of Adonis Venus Cupid and some doggs by Peter Oliver after Titian’. Following Pembroke’s death, Gibson attached himself to Charles, 2nd Earl of Carnarvon, Pembroke’s grandson, and throughout the Interregnum painted many people of that circle including Lady Elizabeth Dormer [V&A] and Elizabeth, Countess of Carnarvon [Scottish National Portrait Gallery; exhibited at Philip Mould & Co ‘Warts and All’ 2013 no.37].

By the Restoration, Gibson was tremendously successful and by the late 1660s he changed his signature from ‘DG’, for ‘Dwarf’ or maybe ‘Dick’ to ‘RG’ for Richard, a pertinent display of his new status. After Cooper’s death Gibson was pronounced the King’s Limner, however one year later was succeeded by Nicholas Dixon, and appointed drawing-master to the Duke of York’s daughters. Gibson had five surviving children by his wife Anne, including most notably Susannah-Penelope Rosse, a successful portrait miniaturist who, as well as painting copies of works by Samuel Cooper, also had a prestigious clientele of her own.

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500 Years of British Art