Cedric Morris was one of the most accomplished painters of the natural world in twentieth-century British art. His bright and often busy compositions of flowers, birds and natural landscapes, both abroad and in Britain, demonstrate a sensitive and endearing naivety, whilst simultaneously capturing the detail of natural beauty. A lifelong plantsman, he brought back unusual species from abroad and became an acclaimed breeder of irises. Throughout his oeuvre his love of plants can be seen permeating into varying subjects. This work was painted during a period in which Morris travelled extensively throughout Western Europe. In the early portion of the 1920s Cedric Morris took inspiration from the places he visited and his painting during this time appears to be expressive of place as manifested through localised architecture and geographically specific flora and fauna. In this painting Morris’ enduring preoccupation with contrasting forms and textures is particularly evident. This fascination with compositional harmony was to become a dominant aesthetic concern throughout...

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Cedric Morris was one of the most accomplished painters of the natural world in twentieth-century British art. His bright and often busy compositions of flowers, birds and natural landscapes, both abroad and in Britain, demonstrate a sensitive and endearing naivety, whilst simultaneously capturing the detail of natural beauty. A lifelong plantsman, he brought back unusual species from abroad and became an acclaimed breeder of irises. Throughout his oeuvre his love of plants can be seen permeating into varying subjects.

This work was painted during a period in which Morris travelled extensively throughout Western Europe. In the early portion of the 1920s Cedric Morris took inspiration from the places he visited and his painting during this time appears to be expressive of place as manifested through localised architecture and geographically specific flora and fauna.

In this painting Morris’ enduring preoccupation with contrasting forms and textures is particularly evident. This fascination with compositional harmony was to become a dominant aesthetic concern throughout his oeuvre. Applying the paint in a varying impasto Morris provides the viewer with a physically descriptive means of interpreting texture. This is equally applicable to his still lives as it is to his painterly representations of towns at home and abroad.

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500 Years of British Art