Menu
Menu
Zoomable Image of Portrait miniature of a Gentleman, wearing a lilac-coloured coat with gold braided button holes and a matching waistcoat and white lace stock

Portrait miniature of a Gentleman, wearing a lilac-coloured coat with gold braided button holes and a matching waistcoat and white lace stock

Jeremiah Meyer R.A. (1735-89)

Portrait miniature of a Gentleman, wearing a lilac-coloured coat with gold braided button holes and a matching waistcoat and white lace stock

Jeremiah Meyer R.A. (1735-89)

Purchase Enquiries

Phone +44(0)20 7499 6818

Email art@philipmould.com

Price:

£1,650

Materials:

Watercolour on ivory

Dimensions:

Oval, 1 1/2 in (38 mm) high

Frame:

Gold frame brooch with pin reverse

Meyer was particularly adept at introducing texture through careful application of paint, as seen here in the delineated lace stock- the pattern created with minute dots of grey paint...

The present work by Meyer is a good example of his work from the later 1760s, when he worked boldly on ivory using a more linear technique than most artists of the period. Sadly, Meyer’s particular mix of watercolour paint has proved to be one of the more fugitive in terms of pigment, but this portrait of a young man retains much of the original colour. Meyer was particularly adept at introducing texture through careful application of paint, as seen here in the delineated lace stock, the pattern created with minute dots of grey paint.

Meyer was the oldest of a group of artists, including Richard Cosway, John Smart and Richard Crosse, all born around the same date, who took lessons at William Shipley 's new drawing school, the first such school in London. After his expensive apprenticeship with Zincke, it seems that he also spent time at the informal St. Martin's Lane 'Academy' run by William Hogarth. As one of the founder members of the Royal Academy, which opened in 1769, Meyer was one of a new generation of miniaturists who would present their art form in direct competition with oil painters. In 1764, Meyer was appointed miniature painter to Queen Charlotte and painter in enamel to King George III and a decade later, in 1774, one critic noted ‘[His] miniatures excell all others in pleasing Expression, Variety of Tints and Freedom of Execution’.[1]



[1] J. Murdoch, J. Murrell, P.J. Noon and Roy Strong, The English Miniature, London, 1981, p.180 (originally quoted by Basil Long, in British Miniaturists, 1929)

Similar works