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Zoomable Image of House on a Welsh Hillside, c. 1935

House on a Welsh Hillside, c. 1935

Sir Cedric Lockwood Morris, Bt. (1889-1982)

House on a Welsh Hillside, c. 1935

Sir Cedric Lockwood Morris, Bt. (1889-1982)

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Price:

Price on request

Materials:

Oil on canvas

Dimensions:

21 3/4 x 29 in (55.2 x 73.6 cm)

Provenance:

Christie’s, London 1987, Manya Igel Fine Arts, London 2000 Private collection, UK

Inscriptions:

Signed ‘Sir Cedric Morris’ verso

Stylistically speaking, the present work closely resembles Morris’s Irish landscapes, painted in County Galway in 1936. Due to the lengthy period he spent in Wales during 1935, it would appear likely that Morris painted this work when travelling through Pembrokeshire over the summer...

Wales was a place of immense significance to Morris. Despite living in Suffolk for the majority of his life, he always felt a great affinity to the land of his birth and heritage. In 1935, Morris travelled extensively through Wales to organise and promote ‘The Contemporary Welsh Art Exhibition’. The exhibition, which Morris coordinated in league with Augustus John (1878–1961), toured the country from July to August, ending in Cardiff. The exhibition eventually culminated in the founding of the Contemporary Arts Society for Wales.


Stylistically speaking, the present work closely resembles Morris’s Irish landscapes, painted in County Galway in 1936. Due to the lengthy period he spent in Wales during 1935, it would appear likely that Morris painted this work when travelling through Pembrokeshire over the summer. Taking inspiration from the local communities bound to arable land in the Welsh countryside, Morris directs the focus of this work onto a humble domestic dwelling on the fertile hillside. The house is an embodiment of Morris’s respect and appreciation for the traditional way of life maintained by his fellow countrymen. The simplified aesthetic remains a dominant aspect of Morris’s pictorial language when articulating a sense of place throughout his career. This aesthetic has its origins in some of his most early landscapes, and is seen emphasised here in a far more confident manner than in Landscape at Newlyn (1919) [see exhibition catalogue].

About the artist

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Sir Cedric Lockwood Morris, Bt.